1-219-765-8600

carol@inkwellcoaching.com

Crown Point, IN

Top
October 21, 2021

The “No Diet” Approach to Health

As promised last week, I’ll present the last 5 principles of Intuitive Eating. In review, the first five are: Reject the Diet Mentality Honor Your H

October 14, 2021

Diets vs. Intuitive Eating

Diet: a regimen of eating and drinking sparingly so as to reduce one’s weight; to eat sparingly or according to prescribed rules. (Merriam-Webs

October 7, 2021

This Weather is Making Me Tired

Some of us haven’t seen the sun in…well, days. There’s been so much rain that I’ve been looking around town to see if anyone is building an ar

September 30, 2021

Knocking Excuses Down for the Loss

If you’ve been reading my blog for the past year, you probably recall the weekly countdown to the birth of baby Angelos. We followed his size in the

September 23, 2021

Have Fun While Staying the Course

Yes, it truly is possible to do both. Many believe it’s an EITHER, OR situation. This past week I received the following text: “Down 1 pound 🙂

September 16, 2021

Celebrate September with Food

Now that we’ve gotten past the almost official end of summer, Labor Day weekend, thoughts of pumpkins and turkeys begin to dance in our heads. Not.

September 9, 2021

Pinky, the Ice Cream Truck

Last Sunday I was outside and heard the familiar sound of an ice cream truck in the neighborhood. I hadn’t seen one of these in…well, quite a long

September 2, 2021

Delicious Memories and a Recipe

I recently received a head of green cabbage as a gift. Now, I’m not one to buy cabbage, although I like it on occasion. Roasting it seemed like a go

August 26, 2021

Love Chocolate

The good news is that chocolate is actually healthy for us. The bad news is that we must be selective in the quality of chocolate we choose in order f

August 23, 2021

Chocolate Nut Clusters

1 cup bittersweet (at least 70% cacao) chocolate, chopped or wafers 1 cup raw almonds                                           

We’re Baking Cookies Together… Sort of

I’m baking cookies this coming Saturday morning, and I’d love for you to join me! Through the magic of ZOOM, we are all gathering to bake and socialize and have a darn good time.

Really. The only time we’ll mute is when the mixers are mixing. It can get loud. We learned this when we did “The Amazing Cake Bake” together.

Now, I know lots of you are sick of zooming. So am I. However, this is a very interactive experience and when we’re done, you’ll have a batch of cookies baked and you won’t have to keep wondering when in the world you’re going to find time to do THAT!

AND, if you don’t have cookies for Santa, he may not show. Do you want to risk it?   

The Particulars

WHAT: The Amazing Cookie Bake with Health Coach Carol

WHERE: ZOOM, so you’re in your own kitchen, and yet we’re together

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2020 from 10:00am to 11:30am CST

HOW: You gather the ingredients you need to make whatever cookie you desire, and we all make cookies

WHY: Creating cookies from scratch is an act of love, and the world could use more love

COST: FREE

This will be similar to those cookie exchanges, except we make our very favorite—or try something new—and enjoy a special treat together. And you know my rule, only eat it if it’s AMAZING! As a result, what may on first glance appear counterintuitive to our health, is not. 

While the cookies are baking, I’ll be coaching you on various aspects of health. We learn from one another and share lots of laughs.

To join in the fun, be sure to email me prior to Saturday, December 12 to save your spot. I’ll then email you the event Zoom link, along with any special instructions.

 Are you in December overwhelm?

As you prepare for the holidays, deal with the continuation of the pandemic, miss your friends, and seek the happy news of each day, you may find it a challenge to prepare meals.     

Or get some exercise.

Or meditate.

Or all of the above.

May I suggest a simple solution?

Do ONE of them. Plan one meal that is easy for you to prepare during the week. Just one. And see what happens.

Some quick and easy ideas:

  • Pan fry some hamburgers and add a tossed salad.
  • Slice up a store-bought rotisserie chicken and sauté some spinach. Cook up a big batch of wild rice (or whatever kind of rice you like) to have on hand to go with this and other meals.
  • Broil some salmon to go with that leftover rice and a salad.
  • Get creative with some omelets or roast a massive pan of vegetables.
  • Brown some ground turkey or pork, mix with a jar of spaghetti sauce and cook up your favorite pasta for easy Bolognese. And of course, add a tossed salad.

If you don’t like any of these ideas, I’m sure you have at least one easy recipe that you like to make.

Or schedule a walk or a virtual exercise class into your life. Sit quietly and practice breathing for 5-10 minutes one morning.

You choose.

If you are looking for perfection these days, please let it go. Plan to do something that makes you feel less stressed and happier.

When you accomplish one small thing that you’ve been missing, whatever that is, you create momentum that propels you forward and leads you out of paralyzing overwhelm.

Week #23 and baby is the size of a large mango.

This is not my favorite fruit to cut because there is a HUGE seed in the middle.  

As it turns out, the mango is a drupe, or stone fruit, which means that it has a large seed in the middle.

Clever.

The easiest way to peel and cut a mango is to buy a bag of frozen chunks. By doing this, you don’t have to deal with cutting around the seed.

I like to add a handful to my protein smoothie or Greek yogurt. Mangoes are also good when diced and added to fruit salad, salsa, and quinoa salad.

Because of their impressive nutritional profile, this fruit has been associated with many health benefits, including potential anticancer effects as well as improved immunity, heart, digestive, eye, skin and hair health.

They are high in sugar, so it’s best to limit intake to less than 2 cups per day.

Peace,
Carol

“Sometimes you aren’t listening to your body because you’re listening to everybody else’s expectations.” ― Ann Voskamp

So, the Marshmallows Caught Fire…

Thanksgiving Day is but a faint memory, as we fast forward into Advent and the season of Christmas.

It was quiet around the Slager home, until the marshmallows caught fire. For the record, our dinner would not make Martha Stewart proud.        

And that’s fine with us.

Our routine goes something like this: I bake two pumpkin pies on Wednesday evening, and we immediately dive into one. I eat a small piece of pie Thanksgiving morning with my breakfast.

Pie is REALLY delicious when you’re not stuffed.  

We had a charcoal grilled turkey seasoned with a dry rub, gluten-free and gluten-filled stuffing, mashed potatoes, sautéed green beans, sweet potato casserole topped with lightly toasted marshmallows, fresh cranberries and cranberry sauce out of the can.

Mr. Non-Compliant will not eat fresh cranberries, so I have to buy the sauce for him. The trick is cutting it so that the ridges from the can are hidden.

I threw together some gravy made from chicken bone broth at the very last minute.

And about those burnt marshmallows. My helper (who shall remain anonymous and was not Mr. NC) was given instructions to watch them carefully while they were under the broiler.

You can see what happened. (Does this mean we’re leaving a bigger carbon footprint?)

Anyway, I scraped the burnt mess off and we put fresh marshmallows on and tried again. The results were much more acceptable.

At least I didn’t set off the smoke alarm. That usually happens when I make the Christmas brisket.  

Week #22, and baby is the size of a spaghetti squash.

This winter squash is high in fiber and rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Low carb fans like to use this in place of pasta, because the strands resemble spaghetti. Hence, the name.

The easiest way I’ve found to cook one of these: Bake entire squash in 400 degree oven for an hour or more, depending on size. Turn after 30 minutes. Fork to check tenderness. The longer you roast it, the softer the “spaghetti” will be. Allow to cool and cut in half. Remove seeds and scrape out strands with a fork. Top with your choice of seasonings or sauces — such as garlic, parmesan, marinara sauce, meatballs, or veggies. You could also sauté the cooked strands with a bit of oil and your favorite seasonings to serve as a side dish.

This is not one of my favorites, and I’ve tried it various ways. It’s pretty neat though, the way it behaves like spaghetti. If you’ve not tried it, ‘tis the season. You might like it!

Your Special Invitation and My Gift to You

WHAT: The Amazing Cookie Bake with Health Coach Carol

WHERE: ZOOM, so you’re in your own kitchen, and yet we’re together

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2020 from 10:00am to 11:30am

HOW: You gather the ingredients you need to make whatever cookie you desire, and we all make cookies

WHY: Creating cookies from scratch is an act of love, and the world could use more love

COST: FREE

This will be similar to those cookie exchanges, except we make our very favorite—or try something new—and enjoy a special treat together. And you know my rule, only eat it if it’s AMAZING! As a result, what may on first glance appear counterintuitive to our health, is not. 

While the cookies are baking, I’ll be coaching you on various aspects of health. We learn from one another and share lots of laughs.

To join in the fun, be sure to email me prior to Saturday, December 12 to save your spot. I’ll then email you the event Zoom link, along with any special instructions.

Sending love and joy,
Carol

 “Sometimes me think, “What is friend?” And then me say, “Friend is someone to share the last cookie with.”—Cookie Monster

Cookies, Carrots, and Giving Thanks

Here it is November, and everything is still pretty weird. I find it hard to believe that we’ve almost blown through another year, even though it seems like we’ve been in 2020 for SO long.

Wherever you are celebrating Thanksgiving, I hope you have something and someone to be grateful for today—and every day. As I again read “One Thousand Gifts” by Ann Voskamp, I am reminded that the way to live fully is to always count my gifts.     

Always.

If you’re looking for some light reading after your turkey dinner, stay here and learn a bit about carrots, the size of my friend’s baby at week #21. Oh, and I have a surprise for you after the carrot recipe. If you love to eat AMAZING cookies, you must check it out!

Cool Stuff to Know About Carrots

Carrots are a root vegetable with a number of health benefits. It has been claimed as the “perfect health food.” I’ve heard the same claim from the egg and banana people.

That being said, I guess those are 3 foods that should always be on our grocery list.

Carrots are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, especially biotin, potassium, and vitamins A (from beta carotene), K1 (phylloquinone), B6, and fiber.

They have a relatively low glycemic index (ranging from 16-60). Raw at the low end, then cooked, then puréed.

They contain lots of plant compounds, including carotenoids. These are substances with powerful antioxidant activity that have been linked to improved immune function, a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease, as well as improved eye health.   

Eating fat with your carrots will help you absorb more beta carotene, which converts to vitamin A in your body. Roasting or sautéing carrots in avocado oil is one way to accomplish this. If you eat them raw in salad, the fat from an olive oil-based dressing is perfect.

A side note: Avocado oil has a high smoke point, making it a good choice for cooking at higher temperatures. And no, it doesn’t taste like an avocado. It’s very mild.

Carrots add great color to any dinner plate, making them a perfect side dish. Here’s a simple recipe so you can eat more of this “perfect food.”

Roasted Carrots

  • 1 pound carrots, quartered or cut into sixths lengthwise depending on the size, then into 2-inch lengths
  • Avocado oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Thyme, oregano, or your favorite seasonings

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Toss sliced carrots in a bowl with 2-3 tablespoons of oil, just enough to coat the carrots. Add your desired seasonings and toss. Spread in a single layer on a pan (stoneware is my preference) and place in center of oven. Stir after about 15 minutes, and check for desired tenderness after about 25 minutes. Roasting time depends on how tender you like your carrots. I like to char mine a bit. These will keep several days in the fridge, so make plenty for leftovers.

Your Special Invitation and My Gift to You

WHAT: The Amazing Cookie Bake with Health Coach Carol

WHERE: ZOOM, so you’re in your own kitchen, and yet we’re together

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2020 from 10:00am to 11:30am (central time)

HOW: You gather the ingredients you need to make whatever cookie you desire, and we all make cookies

WHY: Creating cookies from scratch is an act of love, and the world could use more love

COST: FREE

This will be similar to those cookie exchanges, except we make our very favorite—or try something new—and enjoy a special treat together. And you know my rule, only eat it if it’s AMAZING! As a result, what may on first glance appear counterintuitive to our health, is not.   

While the cookies are baking, I’ll be coaching you on various aspects of health. We learn from one another and share lots of laughs.

To join in the fun, be sure to email me prior to Saturday, December 12 to save your spot. I’ll then email you the event Zoom link, along with any special instructions.

Wishing you the most blessed Thanksgiving,
Carol

 “Joy is the realest reality, the fullest life, and joy is always given, never grasped. God gives gifts and I give thanks and I unwrap the gift given: joy.”― Ann Voskamp, “One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are”

Are Bananas Good for You?

Bananas sometimes get a bad rap. The truth is, they have lots of redemptive qualities.

They are among the most important food crops on the planet.

Although this fruit is high in carbohydrates, it contains a good amount of potassium, and vitamins B6 and C.  

They have a relatively low glycemic index of 42-58, depending on their ripeness. Bananas have a high content of resistant starch (that which passes through your gut undigested) and fiber, thereby promoting colon health.

Their potassium and antioxidant content contribute to heart health.  

They make a good snack, since they come already wrapped and are easy to grab when you’re on the go.

Bananas are sweet, satisfying, and give you a boost of energy when you hit that low point between meals.

They go great with peanut butter.

My Sophie dog loves bananas–and peanut butter for that matter.

People with type 2 diabetes should avoid eating lots of well-ripened bananas, especially on an empty stomach. While they have a rather low glycemic index, it’s advisable to check blood sugar levels after consuming high carb/sugar foods.

A baby at week #20 is the size of a banana.

My best banana tip: When they become overripe, I peel them, break in half, and toss in a plastic bag in the freezer. This is my stash for protein smoothies or banana muffins.

So, if you enjoy bananas, they are a good fruit to add to your healthy eating plan.   

This week, we are all preparing—or not–for a unique Thanksgiving.

I am thankful for you.

Much love,
Carol

 “Life is full of banana skins. You slip, you carry on.”– Daphne Guinness