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carol@inkwellcoaching.com

Crown Point, IN

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May 6, 2021

The Gluten Thing: Fad or Fact, Final Week

Today I’m going to wrap up this topic. Not because I’ve covered everything that there is to know about gluten, but because there are other topics

April 29, 2021

The Gluten Thing: Fad or Fact, Part 2

How do you know if you have a gluten issue? It’s possible that you may eat foods containing gluten and not experience any significant digestive issu

April 23, 2021

Veggie Stuffed Turkey Burgers

(The following recipe first appeared in the September 2020 issue of Get Healthy, a publication of The Northwest Indiana Times.) Ingredients: 1 tablesp

April 22, 2021

The Gluten Thing: Fad or Fact, Part 1

What are your thoughts on gluten? Do you eat it, or not? Why are so many people talking about it these days? Just this week I received a call from a f

April 15, 2021

Anchor Habits, Being Still, and My Resident Rabbit

It almost feels as though our world is sort of opening up again. For now. How very indefinite. At any rate, prior to everything shutting down, perhaps

April 8, 2021

3 Reasons Why Losing Weight is Hard

It seems like such a simple concept. Expend more calories than you eat, and BOOM. Off go the pounds. Not so fast. There are lots of reasons why it’s

April 1, 2021

He’s Here, and He’s Adorable

This is week #39 of baby, and guess what? He arrived! Little Angelos is perfect and looks like a little angel—well-dressed in monogrammed attire wit

March 26, 2021

Leek, Potato and Zucchini Hot Cakes

Ingredients: 1 medium potato 2 cups sliced leeks (white and pale green parts only)                                             

March 24, 2021

For the Love of Leeks, and Hot Cakes

It’s the week of the leek. From the looks of the leek I have in my fridge, it’s a good thing that at week #38, baby is about to make his grand wor

March 18, 2021

Swiss Chard, Your Refrigerator, and Advice from Julia

As we close in on this journey at week #37, baby is the size of a bunch of Swiss chard.  Swiss chard falls under the extremely nutrient dense umbrell

So, the Marshmallows Caught Fire…

Thanksgiving Day is but a faint memory, as we fast forward into Advent and the season of Christmas.

It was quiet around the Slager home, until the marshmallows caught fire. For the record, our dinner would not make Martha Stewart proud.        

And that’s fine with us.

Our routine goes something like this: I bake two pumpkin pies on Wednesday evening, and we immediately dive into one. I eat a small piece of pie Thanksgiving morning with my breakfast.

Pie is REALLY delicious when you’re not stuffed.  

We had a charcoal grilled turkey seasoned with a dry rub, gluten-free and gluten-filled stuffing, mashed potatoes, sautéed green beans, sweet potato casserole topped with lightly toasted marshmallows, fresh cranberries and cranberry sauce out of the can.

Mr. Non-Compliant will not eat fresh cranberries, so I have to buy the sauce for him. The trick is cutting it so that the ridges from the can are hidden.

I threw together some gravy made from chicken bone broth at the very last minute.

And about those burnt marshmallows. My helper (who shall remain anonymous and was not Mr. NC) was given instructions to watch them carefully while they were under the broiler.

You can see what happened. (Does this mean we’re leaving a bigger carbon footprint?)

Anyway, I scraped the burnt mess off and we put fresh marshmallows on and tried again. The results were much more acceptable.

At least I didn’t set off the smoke alarm. That usually happens when I make the Christmas brisket.  

Week #22, and baby is the size of a spaghetti squash.

This winter squash is high in fiber and rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Low carb fans like to use this in place of pasta, because the strands resemble spaghetti. Hence, the name.

The easiest way I’ve found to cook one of these: Bake entire squash in 400 degree oven for an hour or more, depending on size. Turn after 30 minutes. Fork to check tenderness. The longer you roast it, the softer the “spaghetti” will be. Allow to cool and cut in half. Remove seeds and scrape out strands with a fork. Top with your choice of seasonings or sauces — such as garlic, parmesan, marinara sauce, meatballs, or veggies. You could also sauté the cooked strands with a bit of oil and your favorite seasonings to serve as a side dish.

This is not one of my favorites, and I’ve tried it various ways. It’s pretty neat though, the way it behaves like spaghetti. If you’ve not tried it, ‘tis the season. You might like it!

Your Special Invitation and My Gift to You

WHAT: The Amazing Cookie Bake with Health Coach Carol

WHERE: ZOOM, so you’re in your own kitchen, and yet we’re together

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2020 from 10:00am to 11:30am

HOW: You gather the ingredients you need to make whatever cookie you desire, and we all make cookies

WHY: Creating cookies from scratch is an act of love, and the world could use more love

COST: FREE

This will be similar to those cookie exchanges, except we make our very favorite—or try something new—and enjoy a special treat together. And you know my rule, only eat it if it’s AMAZING! As a result, what may on first glance appear counterintuitive to our health, is not. 

While the cookies are baking, I’ll be coaching you on various aspects of health. We learn from one another and share lots of laughs.

To join in the fun, be sure to email me prior to Saturday, December 12 to save your spot. I’ll then email you the event Zoom link, along with any special instructions.

Sending love and joy,
Carol

 “Sometimes me think, “What is friend?” And then me say, “Friend is someone to share the last cookie with.”—Cookie Monster

Cookies, Carrots, and Giving Thanks

Here it is November, and everything is still pretty weird. I find it hard to believe that we’ve almost blown through another year, even though it seems like we’ve been in 2020 for SO long.

Wherever you are celebrating Thanksgiving, I hope you have something and someone to be grateful for today—and every day. As I again read “One Thousand Gifts” by Ann Voskamp, I am reminded that the way to live fully is to always count my gifts.     

Always.

If you’re looking for some light reading after your turkey dinner, stay here and learn a bit about carrots, the size of my friend’s baby at week #21. Oh, and I have a surprise for you after the carrot recipe. If you love to eat AMAZING cookies, you must check it out!

Cool Stuff to Know About Carrots

Carrots are a root vegetable with a number of health benefits. It has been claimed as the “perfect health food.” I’ve heard the same claim from the egg and banana people.

That being said, I guess those are 3 foods that should always be on our grocery list.

Carrots are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, especially biotin, potassium, and vitamins A (from beta carotene), K1 (phylloquinone), B6, and fiber.

They have a relatively low glycemic index (ranging from 16-60). Raw at the low end, then cooked, then puréed.

They contain lots of plant compounds, including carotenoids. These are substances with powerful antioxidant activity that have been linked to improved immune function, a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease, as well as improved eye health.   

Eating fat with your carrots will help you absorb more beta carotene, which converts to vitamin A in your body. Roasting or sautéing carrots in avocado oil is one way to accomplish this. If you eat them raw in salad, the fat from an olive oil-based dressing is perfect.

A side note: Avocado oil has a high smoke point, making it a good choice for cooking at higher temperatures. And no, it doesn’t taste like an avocado. It’s very mild.

Carrots add great color to any dinner plate, making them a perfect side dish. Here’s a simple recipe so you can eat more of this “perfect food.”

Roasted Carrots

  • 1 pound carrots, quartered or cut into sixths lengthwise depending on the size, then into 2-inch lengths
  • Avocado oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Thyme, oregano, or your favorite seasonings

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Toss sliced carrots in a bowl with 2-3 tablespoons of oil, just enough to coat the carrots. Add your desired seasonings and toss. Spread in a single layer on a pan (stoneware is my preference) and place in center of oven. Stir after about 15 minutes, and check for desired tenderness after about 25 minutes. Roasting time depends on how tender you like your carrots. I like to char mine a bit. These will keep several days in the fridge, so make plenty for leftovers.

Your Special Invitation and My Gift to You

WHAT: The Amazing Cookie Bake with Health Coach Carol

WHERE: ZOOM, so you’re in your own kitchen, and yet we’re together

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2020 from 10:00am to 11:30am (central time)

HOW: You gather the ingredients you need to make whatever cookie you desire, and we all make cookies

WHY: Creating cookies from scratch is an act of love, and the world could use more love

COST: FREE

This will be similar to those cookie exchanges, except we make our very favorite—or try something new—and enjoy a special treat together. And you know my rule, only eat it if it’s AMAZING! As a result, what may on first glance appear counterintuitive to our health, is not.   

While the cookies are baking, I’ll be coaching you on various aspects of health. We learn from one another and share lots of laughs.

To join in the fun, be sure to email me prior to Saturday, December 12 to save your spot. I’ll then email you the event Zoom link, along with any special instructions.

Wishing you the most blessed Thanksgiving,
Carol

 “Joy is the realest reality, the fullest life, and joy is always given, never grasped. God gives gifts and I give thanks and I unwrap the gift given: joy.”― Ann Voskamp, “One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are”

Are Bananas Good for You?

Bananas sometimes get a bad rap. The truth is, they have lots of redemptive qualities.

They are among the most important food crops on the planet.

Although this fruit is high in carbohydrates, it contains a good amount of potassium, and vitamins B6 and C.  

They have a relatively low glycemic index of 42-58, depending on their ripeness. Bananas have a high content of resistant starch (that which passes through your gut undigested) and fiber, thereby promoting colon health.

Their potassium and antioxidant content contribute to heart health.  

They make a good snack, since they come already wrapped and are easy to grab when you’re on the go.

Bananas are sweet, satisfying, and give you a boost of energy when you hit that low point between meals.

They go great with peanut butter.

My Sophie dog loves bananas–and peanut butter for that matter.

People with type 2 diabetes should avoid eating lots of well-ripened bananas, especially on an empty stomach. While they have a rather low glycemic index, it’s advisable to check blood sugar levels after consuming high carb/sugar foods.

A baby at week #20 is the size of a banana.

My best banana tip: When they become overripe, I peel them, break in half, and toss in a plastic bag in the freezer. This is my stash for protein smoothies or banana muffins.

So, if you enjoy bananas, they are a good fruit to add to your healthy eating plan.   

This week, we are all preparing—or not–for a unique Thanksgiving.

I am thankful for you.

Much love,
Carol

 “Life is full of banana skins. You slip, you carry on.”– Daphne Guinness

What to Make for Dinner When the Power Goes Out

As I was writing this, my power went out. It wasn’t just a flicker. It was a full OUTAGE in our local area. Concerned that this could linger into the dinner hour, I began thinking about what I would do about food. What could I make without power?

Tossed salad with canned tuna, tomatoes, cheese, peppers, and broccoli came to mind. I knew this would not thrill Mr. Non-Compliant, however. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were another possibility–acceptable for lunch, not dinner. Most anything we could toss on the grill was frozen, with the exception of some ground pork. Oh, but we had pork burgers yesterday.    

Fortunately, the power was only out for a couple hours, and I was able to carry out my original plan of sautéed scallops, carrots, rice and some leftover green beans.

Good thing the problem was resolved because I need Wi-Fi to send you this email. It’s amazing what we depend on in a day.

Tomato Tip
I recently began to make vegetable beef soup and realized that I didn’t have a can of tomatoes. Not being one to run to the store for a necessary item, I looked around for a substitute. I discovered that 2 cups of chopped fresh tomatoes equal one small can of diced tomatoes. Luckily, I had plenty of grape tomatoes. It took a bit of time to cut those little tomatoes into quarters, however the results were delicious. I must say that the fresh tomatoes made the soup even tastier.

At week 19, my friend’s baby is the size of an heirloom tomato. So, how is an heirloom tomato different than a Beefsteak or Early Girl? Heirloom, a term used interchangeably with Heritage, refers to varieties of tomatoes whose seeds have been passed down for generations. You can actually save seeds from these, plant them, and expect new tomato plants to grow. Not the case with popular commercial varieties. Heirloom tomatoes are not always available, since they are seasonal and typically found at farmer’s markets and produce stands. They come in a variety of colors, sizes, flavors, and textures. When we’re comparing the baby to a tomato, the measurement is about 6 inches in length from head to bottom.  

Now that we’re into fall here in the Hoosier state, I couldn’t find any heirlooms. I stocked up on grape tomatoes, just in case I need to make more soup.

Who Do You Know?
Do you have a friend or family member who is struggling with weight, diabetes, complete overwhelm, or perhaps all of the aforementioned? I have coached clients with these challenges, and more, to a happier, healthier way of life. My program, which typically lasts a minimum of 6 months (it takes time to shift gears after YEARS of struggle), is designed specifically for the individual’s needs. I don’t take on a client unless I know we are a good match, and we have plenty of discussions before a commitment is even considered.

So, who do you know that would benefit from my coaching? Please give it some thought, then pass along this email. With the magic of Zoom, it doesn’t matter where they live, as long as my power is on. 🙂

Sending love,
Carol

“Our coaching experience with Carol far exceeded our expectations. We were overwhelmed and didn’t know what to do or where and how to start. My husband is diabetic and despite all of his medication he was unable to consistently control his blood sugar. With Carol’s help we were able to find a way to accomplish this, and so much more. This was more than a weight loss program. It is a lifestyle program that focuses on how through better food choices and eating habits you can become healthier, sustain weight loss and lead a better life.”—Stella, May 2020